New Creation
 
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Series: All Things New

Title: New Creation

Scripture: 2 Corinthians 5:17

Big Idea: It’s a new year, which means new goals, new resolutions, new habits, and new routines. As good as it is to do new things and improve ourselves, if we are only trying to be a better version of what we already are, it’s just playing dress up. If we do that with our spiritual lives, we are trading the vibrancy of a relationship with Jesus for dusty old religion. As Christians, we are made new in Jesus–not just improved–we are entirely new creations! We should be growing our spiritual understanding of who God is and what he wants us to do because it’s almost inconceivable how much God loves us, and what he’s done to craft us anew in his own image.

Pete Kopplin
Walking With A Limp
 
 

Title: Walking With A Limp

Scripture: Genesis 32:22-32, 2 Corinthians 12:1-10

Big Idea: We all face difficulties and painful experiences in life. We have been taught to cover our weaknesses and pain, and hide them. What we must do is let Jesus use those weaknesses, to show His strength and point others, in their weaknesses and struggles, to Him.

Pete Kopplin
To Be Honest
 
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Series: Arrival

Title: To Be Honest

Scripture: Matthew 1:1-17

Big Idea: Genealogies are boring. But the genealogy in Matthew is the first thing he writes about, before the wise men, before the shepherds, before the star and the gifts and the manger. That means it must be terribly important. Matthew–along with Luke in his own account–lays out a legal, biological, historical claim that Jesus is who he says he is, which frames everything we know about the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus; and it helps us see that these stories are so much more than myths and legends… they are true! Jesus’ birth ushered in the gift of grace, and regardless of where you have come from or what you have done, God’s grace is for you, and God wants nothing more than to write you into his family tree as one of his children.

Pete Kopplin
I Can Hardly Wait!
 
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Series: Arrival

Title: I Can Hardly Wait!

Scripture: Luke 2:22-35

Big Idea: Expectation is about certainty. Anticipation is about hope. When we read about Simeon, we see a man who expected God to do the things he said he’d do; and who was hopeful that today would be the day God would choose to do them. When we expect God to move, we see him more clearly. But when we hope in the promises of God, it affects every part of our lives; from how we live, to what we do, to our attitude, and how we respond to the unexpected. Simeon probably wasn’t expecting the Messiah to come in the form of a child, but Simeon’s certainty in God’s promises, coupled with his hopefulness, allowed him to continue to watch God work with eagerness and anticipation. We need to expect God to move, and hope he moves in and through us as we serve him.

Pete Kopplin
What Did You Expect?
 
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Series: Arrival

Title: What Did You Expect?

Scripture: Deut 18:15-20, Mt 21:10-11 (Messiah as prophet)

Heb 9:11-15 (Jesus as Priest)

2 Sam 7:12-14 (Jesus as King)

Big Idea: What do you expect of Jesus, our Messiah? Do you expect him to be a ragamuffin prophet, wandering through the wilderness? An uptight priest, judging all of those for whom he offers sacrifice? A heavy-handed king, ruling with fear and power? The truth is, Jesus is all three and more, in the most perfect of ways. Jesus doesn’t fit into a nice little box that we can always fully comprehend; but we must not make the mistake of setting our expectations of what he is able to do too low simply because we don’t understand. After all, God used the birth of a child at Christmas to begin our redemption story, and his love is capable of even more than we could imagine. Let’s expect the unexpected through God’s gift of grace.

Pete Kopplin
Signs
 
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Series: Arrival

Title: Signs

Scripture: Matthew 2:1-12

Big Idea: We see signs everywhere, every day, all around us. In this scripture there are signs in stars and dreams as well as in God’s word. God has already given us everything we need to know he is present, if we’d just pay attention to the signs.

Pete Kopplin
Being the Church To Your Friends
 
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Series: Next

Title: Being the Church To Your Friends

Scripture: John 15:13, Mt 22:37-40, Mt 28:18-20, Rm 8:31-39

Big Idea: Would you die for a friend? The Bible says that the greatest gift of love anyone could give is to be willing to die for a friend. If we want to share our friendship with Jesus with people who haven’t met him yet, we need to and be willing to make deep sacrifices in order to show our friends that they are loved by us, and that they are loved by God… because that’s what God has done for each of us.

Pete Kopplin
Being the Church To Your Enemies
 
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Series: Next

Title: Being the Church To Your Enemies

Scripture: Matthew 5:38-48

Big Idea: Loving our friends is easy. Loving our enemies is hard. But the Bible says that we should treat our enemies with just as much kindness and love as we do our friends… maybe even more! When we interact with people who don’t feel the same way about God’s grace that we do, let’s not miss out on the chance to show them by loving them sacrificially. 

Pete Kopplin
Being the Church In Your Church
 
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Series: Next

Title: Being the Church In Your Church

Scripture: Galatians 6:9-10

Big Idea: Doing good is tiring, but it’s fruitful. Doing good takes a commitment, but it comes with the promise of a harvest. It’s our job as the ecclesia–the called out ones–to continue to value what we have been called to by encouraging others in our midst through our service.

Pete Kopplin
Being the Church In Our Homes
 
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Series: Next

Title: Being the Church In Our Homes

Scripture: Psalm 23:4, Matthew 5:4, 2 Corinthians 1:3-7, Deuteronomy 6:5-9, Psalm 127:1

Big Idea: Being the church in your home means being willing to put the needs of other people even above your own rest when you most want it, and even when it’s terribly inconvenient. Sometimes it’s easier to plan to serve at a soup kitchen or go on a mission trip. Our homes are intimate, and where we go to escape the burdens of the world–which, if we aren’t careful, makes them into barricaded environments that allow us to reject the call to serve Christ always, in every place, and in every situation. Serve your family and your guests with the understanding that teaching and modeling the comfort found in redemption allows them the chance to experience God’s comfort for themselves.

Pete Kopplin